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notes


blog: a web site or component of a site that provides links to news from other sites and commentary on the links; also called weblog [Gloves Off's weblog appears on the homepage and continues in the archive.]


First World/Second World/Third World: During the era of decolonization, the world was divided into three geopolitical blocks. This division reflected the hardening of relations as the Cold War set in between the capitalist West [First World] and the Soviet-led [Second World] blocs. "Third World" referred to the non-European world, which was largely poor, and had — for the most part — been colonized by Europe. The Third World was also home to half the globe's population.

[see also the sidebar History File on "Decolonization, ISI, and the Rise of the Third World"]


hegemon: The hegemon is more than just a "world power."  Hegemony defines a state which has an advantage in a number af areas, agro-industrial, commercial, financial, & military. And then, for a relatively short period, the hegemon is able to write the rules governing the world economy as it seems fit.


technical change: Sometimes in economics different major schools of thought use different terms that reflect very different theoretical understandings. "Technical change" is one of those terms. Mainstream [neoclassical] economics these days typically uses the term "technological progress" to represent the process by which older production technologies are displaced by newer, more efficient ones. Marx used the term "technical change" to refers to the cyclical process—driven by economic competition—by which producers become more competitive by investing in new, more productive machinery. While mainstream economics views this process as natural, inevitable and progressive, Marx understood technical change to have another side, as well, because it gives producers a way to get an edge on their competitors by cutting labor costs, as productivity-enhancing machinery allowed producers to cut wages and lay off workers.


url: [uniform resource locator] A url is an internet address (for example, http://www.glovesoff.org/features/), usually consisting of the access protocol (http), the domain name (www.glovesoff.org), and optionally the path to a file or resource residing on that server (features).


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